Missouri Revised Statutes

Chapter 574
Offenses Against Public Order

August 28, 2013




Peace disturbance--penalty.

574.010. 1. A person commits the crime of peace disturbance if:

(1) He unreasonably and knowingly disturbs or alarms another person or persons by:

(a) Loud noise; or

(b) Offensive language addressed in a face-to-face manner to a specific individual and uttered under circumstances which are likely to produce an immediate violent response from a reasonable recipient; or

(c) Threatening to commit a felonious act against any person under circumstances which are likely to cause a reasonable person to fear that such threat may be carried out; or

(d) Fighting; or

(e) Creating a noxious and offensive odor;

(2) He is in a public place or on private property of another without consent and purposely causes inconvenience to another person or persons by unreasonably and physically obstructing:

(a) Vehicular or pedestrian traffic; or

(b) The free ingress or egress to or from a public or private place.

2. Peace disturbance is a class B misdemeanor upon the first conviction. Upon a second or subsequent conviction, peace disturbance is a class A misdemeanor. Upon a third or subsequent conviction, a person shall be sentenced to pay a fine of no less than one thousand dollars and no more than five thousand dollars.

(L. 1977 S.B. 60, A.L. 1984 S.B. 602, A.L. 1993 S.B. 180)



Private peace disturbance.

574.020. 1. A person commits the crime of private peace disturbance if he is on private property and unreasonably and purposely causes alarm to another person or persons on the same premises by:

(1) Threatening to commit a crime against any person; or

(2) Fighting.

2. Private peace disturbance is a class C misdemeanor.

(L. 1977 S.B. 60)

Effective 1-1-79



Peace disturbance definitions.

574.030. For the purposes of sections 574.010 and 574.020

(1) "Property of another" means any property in which the actor does not have a possessory interest;

(2) "Private property" means any place which at the time is not open to the public. It includes property which is owned publicly or privately;

(3) "Public place" means any place which at the time is open to the public. It includes property which is owned publicly or privately;

(4) If a building or structure is divided into separately occupied units, such units are separate premises.

(L. 1977 S.B. 60)

Effective 1-1-79



Disrupting a house of worship, crime of--violation, penalty.

574.035. 1. This section shall be known and may be cited as the "House of Worship Protection Act".

2. For purposes of this section, "house of worship" means any church, synagogue, mosque, other building or structure, or public or private place used for religious worship, religious instruction, or other religious purpose.

3. A person commits the crime of disrupting a house of worship if such person:

(1) Intentionally and unreasonably disturbs, interrupts, or disquiets any house of worship by using profane discourse, rude or indecent behavior, or making noise either within the house of worship or so near it as to disturb the order and solemnity of the worship services; or

(2) Intentionally injures, intimidates, or interferes with or attempts to injure, intimidate, or interfere with any person lawfully exercising the right of religious freedom in or outside of a house of worship or seeking access to a house of worship, whether by force, threat, or physical obstruction.

4. Disrupting a house of worship is a class B misdemeanor. Any second offense is a class A misdemeanor. Any third or subsequent offense is a class D felony.

(L. 2012 S.B. 755)



Unlawful assembly.

574.040. 1. A person commits the crime of unlawful assembly if he knowingly assembles with six or more other persons and agrees with such persons to violate any of the criminal laws of this state or of the United States with force or violence.

2. Unlawful assembly is a class B misdemeanor.

(L. 1977 S.B. 60)

Effective 1-1-79



Rioting.

574.050. 1. A person commits the crime of rioting if he knowingly assembles with six or more other persons and agrees with such persons to violate any of the criminal laws of this state or of the United States with force or violence, and thereafter, while still so assembled, does violate any of said laws with force or violence.

2. Rioting is a class A misdemeanor.

(L. 1977 S.B. 60)

Effective 1-1-79



Refusal to disperse.

574.060. 1. A person commits the crime of refusal to disperse if, being present at the scene of an unlawful assembly, or at the scene of a riot, he knowingly fails or refuses to obey the lawful command of a law enforcement officer to depart from the scene of such unlawful assembly or riot.

2. Refusal to disperse is a class C misdemeanor.

(L. 1977 S.B. 60)

Effective 1-1-79



Promoting civil disorder in the first degree, penalty.

574.070. 1. As used in this section, the following terms mean:

(1) "Civil disorder", any public disturbance involving acts of violence by assemblages of three or more persons, which causes an immediate danger of or results in damage or injury to the property or person of any other individual;

(2) "Explosive or incendiary device", includes:

(a) Dynamite and all other forms of high explosives;

(b) Any explosive bomb, grenade, missile, or similar device; and

(c) Any incendiary bomb or grenade, fire bomb, or similar device, including any device which consists of or includes a breakable container containing a flammable liquid or compound and a wick composed of any material which, when ignited, is capable of igniting such flammable liquid or compound, and can be carried or thrown by one individual acting alone;

(3) "Firearm", any weapon which is designed to or may readily be converted to expel any projectile by the action of an explosive, or the frame or receiver of any such weapon;

(4) "Law enforcement officer", any officer or employee of the United States, any state, any political subdivision of a state, or the District of Columbia. The term "law enforcement officer" shall specifically include, but shall not be limited to, members of the National Guard, as defined in section 101(9) of title 10, United States Code, and members of the organized militia of any state or territory of the United States, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, or the District of Columbia, not included within the definition of National Guard as defined by section 101(9) of title 10, United States Code, and members of the Armed Forces of the United States.

2. Whoever teaches or demonstrates to any other person the use, application, or construction of any firearm, explosive, or incendiary device capable of causing injury or death to any person, knowing or intending that such firearm, explosive, or incendiary device be used in furtherance of a civil disorder, is guilty of the crime of promoting civil disorder in the first degree.

3. Nothing contained in this section shall be construed to prohibit the training or teaching of the use of weapons for law enforcement purposes, hunting, recreation, competition, or other lawful uses and activities.

4. Promoting civil disorder in the first degree is a class C felony.

(L. 1983 S.B. 72 3)



Drunkenness or drinking in certain places prohibited--violation a misdemeanor.

574.075. It shall be unlawful for any person in this state to enter any schoolhouse or church house in which there is an assemblage of people, met for a lawful purpose, or any courthouse, in a drunken or intoxicated and disorderly condition, or to drink or offer to drink any intoxicating liquors in the presence of such assembly of people, or in any courthouse within this state and any person or persons so doing shall be guilty of a misdemeanor; unless, however, the circuit court has by local rule authorized law library associations to conduct social events after business hours in any courthouse.

(RSMo 1939 4638, A.L. 1961 p. 334, A.L. 1977 H.B. 341, A.L. 1978 S.B. 749 562.260, A.L. 2001 S.B. 267)

Prior revisions: 1929 4249; 1919 3499



Institutional vandalism.

574.085. 1. A person commits the crime of institutional vandalism by knowingly vandalizing, defacing or otherwise damaging:

(1) Any church, synagogue or other building, structure or place used for religious worship or other religious purpose;

(2) Any cemetery, mortuary, military monument or other facility used for the purpose of burial or memorializing the dead;

(3) Any school, educational facility, community center, hospital or medical clinic owned and operated by a religious or sectarian group;

(4) The grounds adjacent to, and owned or rented by, any institution, facility, building, structure or place described in subdivision (1), (2), or (3) of this subsection;

(5) Any personal property contained in any institution, facility, building, structure or place described in subdivision (1), (2), or (3) of this subsection; or

(6) Any motor vehicle which is owned, operated, leased or under contract by a school district or a private school for the transportation of school children.

2. Institutional vandalism is punishable as follows:

(1) Institutional vandalism is a class A misdemeanor, except as provided in subdivisions (2) and (3) of this subsection;

(2) Institutional vandalism is a class D felony if the offender commits any act described in subsection 1 of this section which causes damage to, or loss of, the property of another in an amount in excess of one thousand dollars;

(3) Institutional vandalism is a class C felony if the offender commits any act described in subsection 1 of this section which causes damage to, or loss of, the property of another in an amount in excess of five thousand dollars.

3. In determining the amount of damage to property or loss of property, for purposes of this section, damage includes the cost of repair or, where necessary, replacement of the property that was damaged or lost.

(L. 1988 S.B. 678 1, A.L. 1996 H.B. 1086 merged with H.B. 1301 & 1298)

CROSS REFERENCE:

Civil action for damages or injunction, attorney's fees and costs may be awarded prevailing plaintiff, 537.523



Crime of money laundering, committed, when--penalty.

574.105. 1. As used in this section, the following terms mean:

(1) "Conducts", initiating, concluding or participating in initiating or concluding a transaction;

(2) "Criminal activity", any act or activity constituting an offense punishable as a felony pursuant to the laws of Missouri or the United States;

(3) "Currency", currency and coin of the United States;

(4) "Currency transaction", a transaction involving the physical transfer of currency from one person to another. A transaction which is a transfer of funds by means of bank check, bank draft, wire transfer or other written order, and which does not include the physical transfer of currency is not a currency transaction;

(5) "Person", natural persons, partnerships, trusts, estates, associations, corporations and all entities cognizable as legal personalities.

2. A person commits the crime of money laundering if he:

(1) Conducts or attempts to conduct a currency transaction with the purpose to promote or aid the carrying on of criminal activity; or

(2) Conducts or attempts to conduct a currency transaction with the purpose to conceal or disguise in whole or in part the nature, location, source, ownership or control of the proceeds of criminal activity; or

(3) Conducts or attempts to conduct a currency transaction with the purpose to avoid currency transaction reporting requirements under federal law; or

(4) Conducts or attempts to conduct a currency transaction with the purpose to promote or aid the carrying on of criminal activity for the purpose of furthering or making a terrorist threat or act.

3. The crime of money laundering is a class B felony and in addition to penalties otherwise provided by law, a fine of not more than five hundred thousand dollars or twice the amount involved in the transaction, whichever is greater, may be assessed.

(L. 1992 S.B. 705 10, A.L. 2002 S.B. 712)



Making a terrorist threat, penalty.

574.115. 1. A person commits the crime of making a terrorist threat if such person communicates a threat to cause an incident or condition involving danger to life, communicates a knowingly false report of an incident or condition involving danger to life, or knowingly causes a false belief or fear that an incident has occurred or that a condition exists involving danger to life:

(1) With the purpose of frightening ten or more people;

(2) With the purpose of causing the evacuation, quarantine or closure of any portion of a building, inhabitable structure, place of assembly or facility of transportation; or

(3) With reckless disregard of the risk of causing the evacuation, quarantine or closure of any portion of a building, inhabitable structure, place of assembly or facility of transportation; or

(4) With criminal negligence with regard to the risk of causing the evacuation, quarantine or closure of any portion of a building, inhabitable structure, place of assembly or facility of transportation.

2. Making a terrorist threat is a class C felony unless committed under subdivision (3) of subsection 1 of this section in which case it is a class D felony or unless committed under subdivision (4) of subsection 1 of this section in which case it is a class A misdemeanor.

3. For the purpose of this section, "threat" includes an express or implied threat.

4. A person who acts in good faith with the purpose to prevent harm does not commit a crime pursuant to this section.

(L. 2000 S.B. 944 574.150, A.L. 2002 S.B. 712)

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